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Today's Tennis Women's Recruiting
Tennis Women's Recruiting
High School Athletes
Recruiting Calendar

Today Tennis Women's Recruiting

College Tennis

If you are looking to get a college tennis scholarship offer, it is important to understand the details of this recruitment process. Looking over the current rosters of the schools that you are interested in attending for college tennis will help you to discern what kind of athletes they sign. Speaking with a current tennis or coach will go a long way in understanding what they look for in their student-athletes. Swimming coaches will want to know what your training program was like at the high school level so that they can determine your true potential when on the college tennis stage.

Foreign high school players use scholarship-recruiting services to their advantage in seeking tennis scholarships to fund their studies in the states. Looking good to tennis recruiting pros requires a balance of skill and marketing. Keep the focus on your grades and game so you have something worth sharing with them.

During the recruiting process, you will likely have coaches tell you about the benefits of playing tennis in college. For example, some coaches offer new recruits a college scholarship, which provides a tuition free education for student athletes. In addition, college tennis can improve your team building skills. And even if you do not want to go pro, many potential employers tend to favor hiring former student athletes.

During the recruiting process, you will also learn about the different divisions in the NCAA, NAIA, NJCAA and others organizations. Depending on which one you join, there might be a scholarship opportunity.

Tennis Women's Recruiting

Things To Consider

According to NCAA, only 5% (M) and 4.5% (W) of high school tennis players will move from high school to college. It is imperative for young tennis athletes to develop a strong work ethic early in their careers. By developing these habits they are not only prepared for softball for the real world as well.

Men's Out of 158,151 only 7,838 will participated in NCAA Schools.

Women's Out of 190,768 only 8,608 will participated in NCAA Schools.

How to Get Scholarship at a Division III School

Division 3 schools are not allowed to give athletic scholarships on tennis, making it challenging for coaches to find college scholarships and grants for their prospective athletes. Despite the restrictions in giving out athletic scholarships, coaches are still able to recruit some of the best athletes in the nation by giving out academic college scholarships and grants.

Because Division 3 schools are smaller than their Division 1 and Division 2 counterparts, the focus is weighted toward academics. Prospective Division 3 athletes can obtain a list of college scholarships to help piece together a comprehensive financial aid package. With the right list of college scholarships, Division 3 athletes can obtain a quality education at no cost out of pocket.

Campus Visits

The official college campus visit is an integral part of the recruiting process. An official campus visit is defined as a trip in which a student-athlete tours a prospective school. During an official visit, the school is allowed to pay for the lodging, transportation, entertainment, and three meals per day for the student-athlete and their parents or guardians.

A student-athlete can make up to five total official visits to Division I schools but only one to each location. During these trips, the student-athlete may be able to attend a game or practice, tour campus housing facilities, and meet with academic advisors about majors.

A student-athlete can participate in an unlimited amount of unofficial visits. However, during these visits, the only thing that the school can pay for or provide is up to three tickets to a home athletics event.

National Letter of Intent

A National Letter of Intent is an official document indicating a student-athlete's decision to attend a Division I or II College for the purpose of participating in the school's athletics program. The agreement is valid for one academic year, provided that the student is admitted to the school. This program is under the direction of the National Collegiate Athletic Association Eligibility Center.

Although signing a National Letter of Intent is voluntary, many students choose to sign the letter as a ceremonial gesture. Because other schools are not allowed to contact student-athletes who have signed their National Letter of Intent, the official signing of this document effectively concludes the recruitment of the athlete.

Individual sports designate specific days as the official signing day for the athletes to commit to participation at a school. If the student-athlete changes their mind after signing their letter, they will need to request a release from the obligation in order to attend a different school. Without an appeal, they may lose one full year of eligibility.

Division III schools are not allowed to use National Letter of Intents as part of the recruiting process.

Recruiting Terms

There is a myriad of sports scholarship terms used to describe the courtship of a college recruit to play college sports. Although the terms used to describe playing collegiate level sports are often used interchangeably, they actually have distinct meanings.

A contact is when a coach or administrator reaches out officially to meet with a prospective student-athlete in an off-campus meeting.

When the coach or recruiter observes the athlete in competition or in a practice situation, it is called an evaluation.

A verbal commitment is when the student-athlete informs the coaching staff of a school that they intend to play college sports with them. This commitment is not binding, as it precedes the official National Letter of Intent. A verbal commitment often happens before the student-athlete is eligible to sign the official letter and it signifies that they want a sports scholarship offer from that college.

Playing collegiate level sports is an immense commitment. When the college recruit wants to make their commitment to a Division I or II school official and binding, they sign the National Letter of Intent. This contract is good for one academic year.

High School Athletes

For most high school tennis athletes, the senior year is way too late to start the recruiting process. If your goal is to play college tennis, you will need to submit your college applications prior to the start of your junior season. Because of the time-sensitive nature of tennis recruiting, it is important to use the results of your freshman season to generate your target list for scholarship offers, regardless of whether you have College Scouts and Recruiters at your games.

If the student-athlete is competing, the college track and field coach staff is allowed to telephone or send electronic or written correspondence to the student-athlete only if they have consented to the outreach and it takes place during the admissible times. Any other contact outside of written and telephone communication is not permitted during an event in which the student-athlete is a competitor. This rule even applies if the student-athlete is on an official or unofficial visit. In-person contact is prohibited in the football recruiting process during:

Competition or before the contest while at the event site. The moment the student-athlete is officially participating in any activities related to the athletics event through the completion of the competition. This includes team meetings, press conferences, and meals.

The entirety of the athletics event, including competitions that stretch over more than one day. This contact is not allowed until the student-athlete is released from the high school coach or administrator.

Recruiting Calendar

  • CONTACT PERIOD

  • EVALUATION PERIOD

  • DEAD PERIOD

  • QUIET PERIOD

Understanding the NCAA recruiting calendar can help student-athletes and their parents navigate the often complicated process of committing to further their education while playing sports at the collegiate level. Member schools of the NCAA are required to abide by this official calendar, serving as a guide for both the colleges and the student-athletes. There are four defined periods of this process.

CONTACT PERIOD

During this period, college coaches are permitted to have face-to-face contact with prospective college student-athletes as well as their parents or guardians. College coaches and recruiters may also visit the high school athletes at their school and watch them compete and practice. This is the most active time period of the recruiting process

Division I - August 22 through December 9, 2018 and January 2 through July 31, 2019.

EVALUATION PERIOD

Like the contact period, coaches may visit high schools and watch the athlete compete and may also write or call the recruit and their parents. However, unlike the contact period, the coach may not have face-to-face interaction with the recruit outside of the college campus.

Division I - August 1-21, 2018

DEAD PERIOD

As the most restrictive period, the dead period prohibits all in-person interaction and only allows written and phone communication.

Division II - November 12 (7 a.m.) – 14 (7 a.m.), 2018.

Except:When the dead period occurs during the U.S. Diving National Championships, authorized coach staff members are allowed to watch recruits participating in that competition.

Except:When the dead period occurs during the North American Cup Fencing Championship, authorized coach staff members are allowed to watch recruits participating in that competition.

Except:When the dead period occurs during the Junior Olympic Rifle Championships, authorized coach staff members are allowed to watch recruits participating in that competition.

Division I - December 10, 2018, through January 1, 2019 - March 8-9, 2019 - June 5-8, 2019.

QUIET PERIOD

The restrictions intensify during the quiet period. During this time, coaches are allowed to call or write the recruit but the only in-person interaction must occur on the college campus. Recruiters are not allowed to visit the high school and watch the student-athletes compete.

Today's Tennis Women's Recruiting

Today Tennis Women's Recruiting

College Tennis

If you are looking to get a college tennis scholarship offer, it is important to understand the details of this recruitment process. Looking over the current rosters of the schools that you are interested in attending for college tennis will help you to discern what kind of athletes they sign. Speaking with a current tennis or coach will go a long way in understanding what they look for in their student-athletes. Swimming coaches will want to know what your training program was like at the high school level so that they can determine your true potential when on the college tennis stage.

Foreign high school players use scholarship-recruiting services to their advantage in seeking tennis scholarships to fund their studies in the states. Looking good to tennis recruiting pros requires a balance of skill and marketing. Keep the focus on your grades and game so you have something worth sharing with them.

During the recruiting process, you will likely have coaches tell you about the benefits of playing tennis in college. For example, some coaches offer new recruits a college scholarship, which provides a tuition free education for student athletes. In addition, college tennis can improve your team building skills. And even if you do not want to go pro, many potential employers tend to favor hiring former student athletes.

During the recruiting process, you will also learn about the different divisions in the NCAA, NAIA, NJCAA and others organizations. Depending on which one you join, there might be a scholarship opportunity.

Tennis Women's Recruiting

Tennis Women's Recruiting

Things To Consider

According to NCAA, only 5% (M) and 4.5% (W) of high school tennis players will move from high school to college. It is imperative for young tennis athletes to develop a strong work ethic early in their careers. By developing these habits they are not only prepared for softball for the real world as well.

Men's Out of 158,151 only 7,838 will participated in NCAA Schools.

Women's Out of 190,768 only 8,608 will participated in NCAA Schools.

How to Get Scholarship at a Division III School

Division 3 schools are not allowed to give athletic scholarships on tennis, making it challenging for coaches to find college scholarships and grants for their prospective athletes. Despite the restrictions in giving out athletic scholarships, coaches are still able to recruit some of the best athletes in the nation by giving out academic college scholarships and grants.

Because Division 3 schools are smaller than their Division 1 and Division 2 counterparts, the focus is weighted toward academics. Prospective Division 3 athletes can obtain a list of college scholarships to help piece together a comprehensive financial aid package. With the right list of college scholarships, Division 3 athletes can obtain a quality education at no cost out of pocket.

Campus Visits

The official college campus visit is an integral part of the recruiting process. An official campus visit is defined as a trip in which a student-athlete tours a prospective school. During an official visit, the school is allowed to pay for the lodging, transportation, entertainment, and three meals per day for the student-athlete and their parents or guardians.

A student-athlete can make up to five total official visits to Division I schools but only one to each location. During these trips, the student-athlete may be able to attend a game or practice, tour campus housing facilities, and meet with academic advisors about majors.

A student-athlete can participate in an unlimited amount of unofficial visits. However, during these visits, the only thing that the school can pay for or provide is up to three tickets to a home athletics event.

National Letter of Intent

A National Letter of Intent is an official document indicating a student-athlete's decision to attend a Division I or II College for the purpose of participating in the school's athletics program. The agreement is valid for one academic year, provided that the student is admitted to the school. This program is under the direction of the National Collegiate Athletic Association Eligibility Center.

Although signing a National Letter of Intent is voluntary, many students choose to sign the letter as a ceremonial gesture. Because other schools are not allowed to contact student-athletes who have signed their National Letter of Intent, the official signing of this document effectively concludes the recruitment of the athlete.

Individual sports designate specific days as the official signing day for the athletes to commit to participation at a school. If the student-athlete changes their mind after signing their letter, they will need to request a release from the obligation in order to attend a different school. Without an appeal, they may lose one full year of eligibility.

Division III schools are not allowed to use National Letter of Intents as part of the recruiting process.

Recruiting Terms

There is a myriad of sports scholarship terms used to describe the courtship of a college recruit to play college sports. Although the terms used to describe playing collegiate level sports are often used interchangeably, they actually have distinct meanings.

A contact is when a coach or administrator reaches out officially to meet with a prospective student-athlete in an off-campus meeting.

When the coach or recruiter observes the athlete in competition or in a practice situation, it is called an evaluation.

A verbal commitment is when the student-athlete informs the coaching staff of a school that they intend to play college sports with them. This commitment is not binding, as it precedes the official National Letter of Intent. A verbal commitment often happens before the student-athlete is eligible to sign the official letter and it signifies that they want a sports scholarship offer from that college.

Playing collegiate level sports is an immense commitment. When the college recruit wants to make their commitment to a Division I or II school official and binding, they sign the National Letter of Intent. This contract is good for one academic year.

High School Athletes

For most high school tennis athletes, the senior year is way too late to start the recruiting process. If your goal is to play college tennis, you will need to submit your college applications prior to the start of your junior season. Because of the time-sensitive nature of tennis recruiting, it is important to use the results of your freshman season to generate your target list for scholarship offers, regardless of whether you have College Scouts and Recruiters at your games.

If the student-athlete is competing, the college track and field coach staff is allowed to telephone or send electronic or written correspondence to the student-athlete only if they have consented to the outreach and it takes place during the admissible times. Any other contact outside of written and telephone communication is not permitted during an event in which the student-athlete is a competitor. This rule even applies if the student-athlete is on an official or unofficial visit. In-person contact is prohibited in the football recruiting process during:

Competition or before the contest while at the event site. The moment the student-athlete is officially participating in any activities related to the athletics event through the completion of the competition. This includes team meetings, press conferences, and meals.

The entirety of the athletics event, including competitions that stretch over more than one day. This contact is not allowed until the student-athlete is released from the high school coach or administrator.

Recruiting Calendar

Understanding the NCAA recruiting calendar can help student-athletes and their parents navigate the often complicated process of committing to further their education while playing sports at the collegiate level. Member schools of the NCAA are required to abide by this official calendar, serving as a guide for both the colleges and the student-athletes. There are four defined periods of this process.

During this period, college coaches are permitted to have face-to-face contact with prospective college student-athletes as well as their parents or guardians. College coaches and recruiters may also visit the high school athletes at their school and watch them compete and practice. This is the most active time period of the recruiting process

Division I - August 22 through December 9, 2018 and January 2 through July 31, 2019.

Like the contact period, coaches may visit high schools and watch the athlete compete and may also write or call the recruit and their parents. However, unlike the contact period, the coach may not have face-to-face interaction with the recruit outside of the college campus.

Division I - August 1-21, 2018

As the most restrictive period, the dead period prohibits all in-person interaction and only allows written and phone communication.

Division II - November 12 (7 a.m.) – 14 (7 a.m.), 2018.

Except:When the dead period occurs during the U.S. Diving National Championships, authorized coach staff members are allowed to watch recruits participating in that competition.

Except:When the dead period occurs during the North American Cup Fencing Championship, authorized coach staff members are allowed to watch recruits participating in that competition.

Except:When the dead period occurs during the Junior Olympic Rifle Championships, authorized coach staff members are allowed to watch recruits participating in that competition.

Division I - December 10, 2018, through January 1, 2019 - March 8-9, 2019 - June 5-8, 2019.

The restrictions intensify during the quiet period. During this time, coaches are allowed to call or write the recruit but the only in-person interaction must occur on the college campus. Recruiters are not allowed to visit the high school and watch the student-athletes compete.

How many Tennis Women's programs in 1110

NCAA DI SCHOOLS
NCAA DII SCHOOLS
NCAA DIII SCHOOLS
NAIA SCHOOLS
NJCAA SCHOOLS